Educational Technology

Google, AWS, Rackspace affected by Heartbleed OpenSSL flaw – but Azure escapes

Educational Technology News Blog - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 00:35

By Liam Tung, ZDNet

As most cloud infrastructure providers announced fixes to the worrying Heartbleed OpenSSL flaw, Microsoft’s Azure cloud has emerged largely unscathed — but customers running Linux images on it may be affected, the company warned. As of Wednesday, public cloud providers Google, Amazon, Rackspace, Joyant, and CenturyLink had issued updates to inform customers what systems had been patched and what remediation steps needed to be done for components that may be affected by the Heartbleed bug. For a quick recap, the memory leakage bug means attackers can hit up affected servers to extract passwords, private keys, and session tokens, among other data.

http://www.zdnet.com/google-aws-rackspace-affected-by-heartbleed-openssl-flaw-but-azure-escapes-7000028281/

Share on Facebook

Americans’ Trust in Online Higher Ed Rising

Educational Technology News Blog - Fri, 04/18/2014 - 00:30

by Valerie J. Calderon and Susan Sorenson, Gallup

Online colleges and universities continue to evolve, as do Americans’ and business leaders’ opinions about them. While perceptions about the quality of education at these institutions appear to be improving, attitudes toward community colleges and traditional universities remain far more positive at this point. And although more than half of business leaders and Americans in general say companies might be somewhat more likely to hire an online graduate over an equally qualified traditional college graduate, only about one in eight business leaders and one in seven U.S. adults overall say it is very likely. This represents room for improvement in the online education business.

http://www.gallup.com/poll/168416/americans-trust-online-higher-education-rising.aspx

Share on Facebook

Why Feedback Needs To Be Integrated Into Flipped Classroom

Educational Technology News Blog - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 00:40

By David Matheson, Edudemic

Flipped classrooms are getting plenty of headlines and attention lately in educational circles. While conceptually they sound great the reality is that they require a great deal more effort on behalf of both students and teachers. The need for teachers to develop quality material outside class time is a genuine drain on their limited time and becomes a significant obstacle to the uptake of flipping. In a seemingly unrelated topic research is making an ever stronger case that effective feedback in a clear and timely manner has a significant influence of the achievement of student outcomes. This is especially the case for students facing high stakes examinations toward the end of their school experience. Summative evaluation through examinations is far from a new idea nor is returning papers and suggested answers. However, the merging of flipped classrooms and examination feedback may shed new insights and opportunities.

http://www.edudemic.com/flipped-feedback/

Share on Facebook

5 Apps To Supercharge Your Classroom Productivity

Educational Technology News Blog - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 00:35

By Mellow Study, Edudemic

When you are looking to improve your productivity half the battle is finding the will. The other half is discovering and refining a system that will maximize your time and make you the most efficient you possible! These 5 apps all perform a slightly different functions, and when you combine them together they can supercharge your classroom productivity. They keep you updated on your to-dos and keep all of your ‘stuff’ in one place. You’ll waste less time and worry less, have less of a mess, and be more organized!

http://www.edudemic.com/5-apps-to-supercharge-your-study-productivity/

Share on Facebook

Welcome to the Post-XP world, but how on earth did we get here?

Educational Technology News Blog - Thu, 04/17/2014 - 00:30

By Jack Schofield, ZD Net

Summary: The end of Windows XP support was almost as hyped as the Y2K bug, but it’s hard to see any rational reasons why so many organisations stuck with an antique operating system long past its use-by date. There hasn’t been such a build-up of pointless excitement since the Year 2000 bug threatened to destroy civilisation as we know it. Of course, Microsoft ending support for its aged and insecure Windows XP operating system never threatened anything like that, regardless of the XPocalypse-style billing. The real risks are in the longer term, and will probably affect large enterprises and governments. Or at least, those are the ones that will be reported. There is a real risk that malware creators will be able to exploit XP, but it remains to be seen how well its users will be able to defend it. The fact that they couldn’t manage a relatively simple (in most cases) upgrade on time, even when given almost seven years advance warning, suggests not.

http://www.zdnet.com/welcome-to-the-post-xp-world-but-how-on-earth-did-we-get-here-7000028246/

Share on Facebook

Interview: Yves Paul Epelboin, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie

Educause - Connect, Technology In Academia - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 14:44

Yves Paul Epelboin is special advisor to the President for MOOC at Universite Pierre et Marie Curie. In this interview he discusses their approach to MOOCs and higher education in France.

read more

Why You Should Try Video Feedback With Students

Educational Technology News Blog - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 00:39

by Scott Hayden, Edudemic

Using video is an efficient use of time and allows you to provide visual examples to illustrate points in more detailed verbal feedback. Securely stored and shared to your students from the cloud eg inboxing or tweeting links from Dropbox OR shared from your Hard Drive. YouTube can be used (ease of access) where you can adjust the settings to Private so no-one but your student can see it. Once students send you work you can assess wherever you are using any video recording device. See the link below for more.

http://www.edudemic.com/video-feedback-with-students/

Share on Facebook

How Is The Internet Changing Education?

Educational Technology News Blog - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 00:34

By Katie Lepi, Edudemic

The internet has brought great things to education. Research is easier, for sure. And online learning is bringing education options in varying ranges of affordability to a much wider audience. The handy infographic linked below takes a look at how educational power is shifting away from the hands of the institutions and more into the hands of students.

http://www.edudemic.com/internet-education/

Share on Facebook

What the 26 Billion-Thing Internet of Things Portends for IT

Educational Technology News Blog - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 00:31

By David Nagel, THE Journal

The rapid growth of interconnected devices making up the Internet of Things will wreak havoc on data security, storage, servers, networks and end user privacy, according to a new report. There will be 26 billion “things” making up the Internet of Things within six years, according to a report released by Gartner. The implications for IT are profound — in particular for data center operations. “IoT threatens to generate massive amounts of input data from sources that are globally distributed,” said Joe Skorupa, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner, in a statement released to coincide with the report.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/03/18/what-the-26-billion-thing-internet-of-things-portends-for-it.aspx

Share on Facebook

Technology and the Future(s) of the University

Educational Technology News Blog - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 00:39

by By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Georgetown University is calling on its entire campus community to explore what the institution of 2030 will look like and to experiment with new ways of educating students. The impact of its discoveries may ultimately end up being felt throughout American higher ed. Introducing innovation in education is easier when the institution is new. Georgetown University, established in 1789, may not necessarily be the first institution to come to mind when thinking about innovation related to higher education. But an initiative introduced in November, called “Designing the Future(s) of the University,” is calling on the entire campus community to explore what the Georgetown of 2030 will look like and to experiment with new ways of educating its students.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2014/04/01/technology-and-the-futures-of-the-university.aspx

Share on Facebook

Teachers Honored for the Innovative Use of Tech in Science Ed

Educational Technology News Blog - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 00:35

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

Friction, rocketry and alternative energy are some of the projects undertaken by the latest crop of teachers who have been named winners in an annual competition put on by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and Vernier, a company that sells scientific equipment for teachers. All of the educators were selected based on their use of data-collection technology in science classes. The six winners in K-12 were honored during this year’s NSTA National Conference and received $1,000 in cash, $3,000 in Vernier products and $1,500 toward travel expenses to attend the event in Boston.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/04/07/teachers-honored-for-the-innovative-use-of-tech-in-science-ed.aspx

Share on Facebook

One-Third of U.S. Students Use School-Issued Mobile Devices

Educational Technology News Blog - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 00:28

By David Nagel, THE Journal

New research indicates virtually all middle and high school students have access to mobile devices and are using them for schoolwork. And nearly a third of them are using mobile devices issued by their schools. According to the report, “The New Digital Playbook: Understanding the Spectrum of Students’ Activities and Aspirations,” issued by Project Tomorrow in an event taking place in Washington, DC today, 89 percent of high school students (grades 9–12) and 73 percent of middle school students (grades 6–8) have access to smart phones. Another 66 percent in both groups have access to laptops. Sixty-one percent of middle schoolers and 50 percent of high schoolers have access to tablets. And 48 percent of middle schoolers and 39 percent of high schoolers have access to digital readers.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/04/08/a-third-of-secondary-students-use-school-issued-mobile-devices.aspx

Share on Facebook

The Flinch and Other Traps

Educause - Connect, Technology In Academia - Tue, 04/15/2014 - 00:19

Everything that IT leaders do involves a negotiation in one way or another. Yet, focusing on negotiation skills is one of the last things we do when thinking about the professional development needs of our organizations.

Once, while thumbing through a magazine on a cross-country flight, I noticed an advertisement featuring a very distinguished-looking gentleman named Chester Karrass, whose testimonial stated, “In business as in life, you don’t get what you deserve; you get what you negotiate.” Seeing this ad several times before, I decided “why not” and signed up for a Karrass negotiating seminar. While the content of the workshop was predominantly focused on buying and selling, what stuck with me was how applicable it was to the negotiations regarding the expectations and resources that IT leaders face every day.

read more

The Technology Disruptions of Today

Educational Technology News Blog - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 00:39

By Tanya Roscorla, Center for Digital Education

In the last five years, disruptive technology has widened the generation gap faster and further than it has in the past. Tech columnist David Pogue from Yahoo Tech talked about disruptive technology that is changing our lives in the closing keynote at the CoSN annual conference on Friday, March 21. Some of the technologies he highlighted include augmented reality, the Internet of Things and self-driving cars. The augmented reality app Word Lens, for example, translates words on a sign through live video, showing the English translation on the device’s screen. And the Internet of Things allows people to remotely control and monitor Web-connected devices like thermostats and security cameras.

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/news/Technology-Disruptions.html

Share on Facebook

5 Education Problems that Superintendents Face

Educational Technology News Blog - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 00:35

By Tanya Roscorla, Center for Digital Ed

If we don’t change the way we teach, we could face a student revolt that will cause seismic shifts in how education works in the United States. Superintendents say this is just one of the things that has them concerned. Several shared their thoughts before and during a panel discussion at the 2014 CoSN (Consortium for School Networking) conference. When it comes to technology challenges, superintendents worry about device selection, student data privacy and helping educators get comfortable with technology tools. Let’s find out what problems they face and how they plan to deal with them.

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/news/5-Education-Problems-that-Superintendents-Face.html

Share on Facebook

Can Online Teaching Improve Face to Face Instruction?

Educational Technology News Blog - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 00:30

by Michael L. Rodgers and Mary Harriet Talbut, Tomorrow’s Professor

In general, online courses require greater planning, more extensive resources, more formalized communication, and more detailed organization than do face to face courses. But, the work that goes into creating an online course, and the insights forthcoming from comparison of online and face to face versions of the course, can make the face to face course better in many ways.

http://cgi.stanford.edu/~dept-ctl/cgi-bin/tomprof/enewsletter.php

Share on Facebook

Whoa. Education Is A 7 Trillion Dollar Industry

Educational Technology News Blog - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 00:39

By Katie Lepi, Edudemic

Education is a huge industry. It touches nearly everyone out there, so it should be. But often times when we think of ‘big industries’ we think of things like banking, cars, or consumer electronics. Well did you know exactly how big of an industry education is? And just how rapidly and how much the industry is changing because of new technologies? The handy infographic linked below, from Knewton and Column Five Media takes a look at some of these questions and more. Learn how digital education is poised to transform the way teachers teach and how students learn.

http://www.edudemic.com/whoa-education-is-a-7-trillion-dollar-industry/

Share on Facebook

Why Feedback Needs To Be Integrated Into Flipped Classrooms

Educational Technology News Blog - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 00:35

By David Matheson, Edudemic

The need for teachers to develop quality material outside class time is a genuine drain on their limited time and becomes a significant obstacle to the uptake of flipping. In a seemingly unrelated topic research is making an ever stronger case that effective feedback in a clear and timely manner has a significant influence of the achievement of student outcomes. This is especially the case for students facing high stakes examinations toward the end of their school experience. Summative evaluation through examinations is far from a new idea nor is returning papers and suggested answers. However, the merging of flipped classrooms and examination feedback may shed new insights and opportunities.

http://www.edudemic.com/flipped-feedback/

Share on Facebook

Five Biometric Alternatives To The Password

Educational Technology News Blog - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 00:29

by CNN Wire

There are many things that make you special: Your sense of humor, your dance moves, your personal style, the shape of your ear. That’s right, your ear. The password has had its moment, but those hard-to-remember strings of number and letters are increasingly insecure and clumsy to manage. The next wave in computer security will be biometric authentication, the futuristic practice of using unique behavioral and biological traits such as fingerprints, gait and yes, even ear shape to confirm your identity. You might already have the necessary equipment to detect some of these your pocket.

http://wreg.com/2014/04/05/five-biometric-alternatives-to-the-password/

Share on Facebook

The business of ed-tech: From blue lights to mobile apps

Educational Technology News Blog - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 00:35

By Denny Carter, eCampus News

Among TapShield’s most popular features has been the Yank technology, which, when activated, sends an emergency signal to campus authorities if a user’s headphones are pulled from a mobile device. Within 10-15 seconds of the incident, campus police can dispatch responders to the scene. The Yank feature, Johnson said, has proven popular among college students who enjoy an evening run that can find them along on campus late at night. “The problem comes when you’re using headphones on run at night and you don’t have situational awareness around you because one of your greatest senses is diminished. You can’t hear,” he said. “It makes a student very vulnerable.”

http://www.ecampusnews.com/safety-and-security/lights-mobile-apps-523/

Share on Facebook
Syndicate content