Miscellaneous

Ria #6: Kirsten Behling On Research Collaboration

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


Research Unit, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Kirsten and Katie talk about their work together as research collaborators, discuss what to do when collaborations go wrong, and share some best practices for setting up strong collaborations from the start. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #7: Dr. Josh Weller On Psychometrics

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Josh explains what it means to be a psychometrician and shares examples of how he uses psychometrics in his research on risk-taking tendencies and decision-making competence. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #8: Dr. Nina Huntemann On Learning New Research Skills At Mid-Career

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Nina shares some of her strategies for learning new research skills at mid-career as well as how she keeps up with work while traveling.
[Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #9: Dr. Kevin Gannon On Balancing Research, Teaching, And Service

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Kevin shares strategies for juggling research with teaching and service and some of the things he has learned in his time as a textbook author. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

June 2016 Preview Clips

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this June 2016 preview, Katie shares clips from upcoming episodes and offers a final call for contributions to RIA's first call-in episode. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #10: Dr. Dannelle Stevens On Journaling Best Practices

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Dannelle shares some of her ideas on the role of journaling for researchers and shares tips and ideas for an effective journaling practice. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #11: Steve Van Tuyl On Data Management

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Katie talks with Steve about data management best practices and strategies for writing effective data management plans. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #12: Dr. Katie Linder On Creating A Five-Year Research Plan

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this solo episode, Katie shares tips and strategies for creating a five-year research and professional development plan. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #13: Brad Zdenek On Institutional Research Agendas

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, , Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Katie talks with Brad about his work at COIL and some of the benefits and challenges of creating institutional research agendas. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

July 2016 Preview Clips

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 Take a listen to our July 2016 preview clips! [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #14: Chrysanthemum Mattison Hayes On Being A Data Analyst

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Chrysanthemum shares about her experiences as a research and data analyst and offers some examples of data projects related to student success in higher education. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #15: Dr. Geoff Pullum On Theoretical Research

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Geoff talks about his experience with theoretical research and how best to share that research with the public. [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Ria #16: Dr. Tanya Joosten On Distance Education Research

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 21:00


, Ecampus Research Unit | Oregon State University, Jul 22, 2016 In this episode, Tanya discusses her work at the National Research Center for Distance Education and Technological Advancements (DETA). [Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Intelligent assistants are catalysts for digital commerce

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 15:00


Dan Miller, Derek Top, Nicolas De Kouchkovsky, Opus Research, Jul 22, 2016

It's important that  we note that "we are entering a world where an intelligence assistant recognizes our 'intent.' This could spawn a massive consumer behavior shift, as AI-influenced bots would mean far fewer Google searches by humans." I had hoped that by this time our 'personal learning assistant' could have made the list. Alas. Here's a  high resolution version of the image.

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

How Companies Are Benefiting from “Lite” Artificial Intelligence

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 15:00


Seth Earley, Harvard Business Review, Jul 22, 2016

Artificial Intelligence as a Service (AIAAS) is here. As this article notes, "At the less-expensive end is a knowledge-based approach that organizes data and language into highly malleable and helpful blocks of information." For example, there's "a virtual assistant known as ABIe (pronounced “ Abby” ) to answer questions from its 12,000 agents (for All State). It was a bit like hiring Apple’ s Siri at a sliver of the cost. Mike Barton, the division’ s president, put it this way: 'We think of ABIe as our precursor to cognitive computing on a shoestring.'"

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

On the Nature of Mathematical Concepts

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 12:00


Verena Huber-Dyson, Edge, Jul 22, 2016

I studied under  Verena Huber-Dyson when I was in Calgary and was opened to a world where we question assumptions, consider alternative (but complete and consistent) forms of formalization, and a range of reasons why we ought to question our core 'truths' about mathematics and logic. "This century has seen the development of a powerful tool, that of formalization, in commerce and daily life as well as in the sciences and mathematics. But we must not forget that it is only a tool. An indiscriminate demand for fool proof rules and dogmatic adherence to universal policies must lead to impasses," she writes in this article from 1998. "Think of mathematics as a jungle in which we are trying to find our way. We scramble up trees for lookouts, we jump from one branch to another guided by a good sense of what to expect until we are ready to span tight ropes (proofs) between out posts (axioms) chosen judiciously. And when we stop to ask what guides us so remarkably well, the most convincing answer is that the whole jungle is of our own collective making - in the sense of being a selection out of a primeval soup of possibilities. Monkeys are making of their habitat something quite different from what a pedestrian experiences as a jungle."

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

The Philosophical Concept of Algorithmic Intelligence

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 12:00


Pierre Levy, Pierre Levy's Blog, Jul 22, 2016

"A science of human intelligence is indeed possible," writes Pierre Levy in a post last year, "but on the condition that we solve the problem of the mathematical modelling of language. I am speaking here of a complete scientific modelling of language, one that would not be limited to the purely logical and syntactic aspects or to statistical correlations of corpora of texts, but would be capable of expressing semantic relationships formed between units of meaning, and doing so in an algebraic, generative mode." I think we can agree that Facebook isn't this. Where the question gets hard is when we ask whether this is what we need. Is a scientific modelling of language, or of thought, possible? Is it desirable? Would we find this language physically instantiated in the human brain? 

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

Consciousness is a Big Suitcase

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 12:00


Marvin Minsky, John Brockman, Edge, Jul 22, 2016

Words like like 'intuition' or 'consciousness' are "suitcase words", says Marvin Minsky in this interview from 1998, "that all of us use to encapsulate our jumbled ideas about our minds. We use those words as suitcases in which to contain all sorts of mysteries that we can't yet explain." And in turn, he says, we start to think of these as entities in their own right, as things with no structures we can analyze. But consciousness, he says, "contains perhaps 40 or 50 different mechanisms that are involved in a huge network of intricate interactions...  human brain contains several hundred different sub-organs, each of which does somewhat different things." Or, for example, "A 'meaning' is not a simple thing. It is a complex collection of structures and processes, embedded in a huge network of other such structures and processes." Or memory: "we use... hundreds of different brain centers that use different schemes to represent things in different ways. Learning is no simple thing."

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

The (not so) secret life of a networked and networking scholar

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 07/22/2016 - 09:00


Paul Prinsloo, Open distance teaching and learning, Jul 22, 2016

I am increasingly left wondering how long social networks - Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, LinkedIn - can survive. They can disappear absurdly quickly - remember Friendster? MySpace? And I think that dissatisfaction with the existing sites is strong enough that users will quickly drop them if something better comes along. There are several issues. One is the lack of privacy and security. This is what Paul Prinsloo addresses in this article. But there's more. Another are the sorting algorithms that struggle with the basic contradiction between what we want to see and what the social network makes money showing us. Another is the steadily dropping quality of discourse on these sites. The advice to "never read the comments" should now be applied to the daily news.

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

Positive, Negative or Neutral? Crucial Conversations on Digital Citizenship

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 07/21/2016 - 19:00


George Couros, Connected Principals, Jul 21, 2016

Me: Have you been told not to do bad things online?
Student: Yes.
Me: How about good things?
Student: Never.

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous
Syndicate content