Miscellaneous

Instructional Design in the VUCA World

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 20:00
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Sahana Chattopadhyay, ID, Other Reflections, Dec 12, 2014

Good article describing how the practice of instructional design has to change to adapt to new circumstances.  The author writes, "One of the implications of the shift is that instructional designers can no longer think about designing only formal training programs that will go on the LMS. They have to think of the entire spectrum and see it holistically... an instructional designer today is required to not only understand the fundamentals of good instructional design but must also expand his/her skill sets to include an  understanding  of community management, the spectrum of learning from formal to informal, the impact of social, local and mobile on user behaviour, the need to equip users with self-managed learning skills."

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5 Reasons Your Portfolio Should Be A Blog

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 20:00


George Couros, Connected Principals, Dec 12, 2014

My own portfolio, such as it is, isn't any sort of 'thing', though a certain amount of it is a blog (the rest is YouTube videos, Flickr photos, Slideshare presentations, and a radio station currently off air that nobody listens to (I really have to fix that)). The reasons advanced are pretty good, though, and apply to all these non-bloggy forms of personal publishing: they develop literacies, build an audience, and help you create your own voice. I know a lot of people are reluctant to work publicly or to commit to regular long-form communication. But it's hard for me to understand when compared to the significant benefits you derive from it. If all you're doing is tweeting, you're short-changing yourself.

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YouTube shows video creators what copyright restrictions their audio will face

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 17:00


Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, Dec 12, 2014

More reason to manage and upload your own videos for yourself. YouTube is increasingly a commercial publishing platform, with commercial publishing rules, which means you can even share snippets of things that may be copyright material even though such use is easily protected under fair use). "The video-sharing platform has long used the controversial ContentID system to enforce copyright, automatically scanning uploaded videos for infringing audio. If such audio is found, the video is flagged or even removed."

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Categories: Miscellaneous

Hachette Wants to Turn Twitter Into a Bookstore

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 17:00


Joshua Brustein, BloombergBusinessweek, Dec 12, 2014

I'm not sure I get the appeal of Amanda Palmer and I'm not sure of the relevance of showing a topless photo of her on this story about Twitter becoming a marketplace for books, especially since I don't see books per se as having much of a future themselves, but I guess there's no limit to how far we'll turn back the wheel of time in an effort to monetize our conversations with each other. And going topless seems to be what Amanda Palmer does, mostly. Social media as we know it is not long overdue for a disruption. And magazines like this retro article from Bloomberg even more so.

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Online harassment: 'Dedicated' trolls will find way around anti-abuse rules

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 14:00
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Andre Mayer, CBC News, Dec 11, 2014

Another article describing how difficult it is to block the torrent of abuse that can come your way online. Personally, I think that the only way to avoid such abuse is to block people from being able to comment on others' websites entirely. Each person gets their own space, where they can caterwaul to their own content. People, meanwhile, read only the things their friends write or refer. It's not hard to build such a system, but advertisers - for the same reason as spammers and griefers - have no interest in seeing it happen. I'll put some work i nto it in the new year, and you'll see what such a system looks like.

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EB2014, Flipped teaching,flipped class by iStudio

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 09:00
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Reokim 김영대, YouTube, Dec 11, 2014

Here I am at Online Educa Berlin being show how to create my own broadcast studio ("Now I can be Jon Stewart," I commented). It's still pretty expensive (note that you're getting broadcast cameras and screens) but the software will make it possible for anyone to manage their own video production. Who needs staff? How long will it be before something like this is widely available to, say, high school students? The product is  iStudio and the company is Darim.

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What's Next for E-Textbooks?

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 09:00
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Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology, Dec 11, 2014

I think everybody following the industry already knows this, but according to this report e-textbooks of the future won't look much like textbooks. "Imagine, instead, an online service that remixes itself on the fly for consumption via any device, with concepts tailored to a specific student's knowledge gaps and learning style," writes Dian Schaffhauser. I'm actually hoping for a bit more than that. Pearson's REVEL, for example, sounds unimaginative: it "mixes text, interactive exercises, infographics, social features and video segments for students, who can use it on their mobile devices." But there will be more. As the article notes, publishers are turning themselves into software companies.

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Canada First Research Excellence Fund

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 09:00


Press Release, Government of Canada, Dec 11, 2014

The Canadian government has announced a large new research funding program. It will be administered by the the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and focus on five priority areas: environment and agriculture, health and life sciences, natural resources and energy, information and communications technology, and advanced manufacturing. More from Globe and Mail, AUCC News Release, CAUT News Release, Maclean's, Full Strategy. Via Academica.

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Categories: Miscellaneous

he Case for ‘Passive’ Learning – The ‘Silent’ Community of Online Learners

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 18:00


Katy Smith, Donna Smith, Distance, The European Journal of Open, E-Learning (EURODL), Dec 10, 2014

"‘ Passive,’ " say the authors, "can be a, somewhat, provocative word." And so there is some controversy in the idea that some people may find value in passive learning. We would call such participants "lurkers" today (with no change in the provocation). This paper examines the idea within the context of two social science courses offered at the Open University. That's probably not enough scale to provide any reasonable set of results (why don't researchers in this field do anything at scale?) but at least it's a conversation starter. "Perhaps," suggest the authors, "engagement (with material, with students, with tutors etc.) is critical, but not necessarily ‘ active’ participation." Not surprisingly, the authors find there is a case to be made.

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Yahoo Starts Selling Flickr Users’ Photos

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 10:00
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Susan Gunelius, Newstex, Dec 09, 2014

So here's why I kept the 'Non-Commercial' clause on all my Flickr photo Creative Commons licenses: " The Wall Street Journal reported that Yahoo! will begin selling prints of 50 million Creative Commons-licensed images uploaded by Flickr users... Images bearing a Creative Commons licenses that allow for commercial use will be sold as canvas prints for up to $49 each with no payments going to the image owners. Instead, Yahoo! will retain all revenues."

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EPortfolios and Badges Workshop

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 14:00


Stephen Downes, Half an Hour, Dec 08, 2014

Summary of the pre-conference workshop at Online Educa Berlin. This session looked at ePortfolios and Badges, as the title suggests. This is a comprehensive topic, including subjects like qualifications, certifications and competencies.

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Rheingold, Lewin, Stevenson

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 14:00
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Stephen Downes, Half an Hour, Dec 08, 2014

Summary notes from the opening plenary of Online Educa Berlin, which featured Howard Rheingold, who spoke about social learning, Lisa Lewin, who suggested innovators should cooperate with commercializers, and mark Stevenson, who threw a lot of cliché s at us.

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Does Data Corrupt Education

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 14:00
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Stephen Downes, Half an Hour, Dec 08, 2014

Summary of a not-so-serious Oxford-style debate at Online Educa Berlin on the question of whether data corrupts education. One prevailing view was that data should corrupt education, because education as it currently designed needs fixing. A lot of the discussion pointed to Big Data, though the question was more general. Ellen Wagner, Viktor Mayer-Schö nberger, George Siemens and Inge de Waard were the participants.

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Open educational Resources 2.0

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 11:00


Stephen Downes, Half an Hour, Dec 08, 2014

In the world of MOOCs, what do we have to say about open educational resources (OERs) and distance education? This is a set of summary of a panel at Online Educa Berlin on the topic.

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Reclaiming Personal Learning

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 12/08/2014 - 08:00
[Slides][Audio]

Part of a wider session called 'Education's Reality Check', this presentation highlights the need for, and structure of, personal learning, introducing participants to the Learning and Performance Support Systems project at lpss.me

Online Educa Berlin, Berlin, Germany (Keynote) Dec 05, 2014 [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

Digital Natives Like a Good Lecture, Too

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 18:00


Katrina Gulliver, Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec 06, 2014

Bob Rightside said, in Facebook, "Finally, someone else said it (in the Chronicle)." My first thought was, "well of course it was the Chronicle. Authored by a professor who polled her students (because, of course, that's the source of all social science these days) the article professes that "we have the qualifications and skill, and for students, being in the same room as an expert is an valuable part of university experience. "These same people saying all the nice things about professors, who paid so much money to be in a class with professors - they're not being  graded by these professors, are they?" Why oh why is basic simple logic so difficult for the Chronicle?

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Open teaching philosophy is about sharing

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 09:00
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Arpiné Grigoryan, PanArmenianNet, Dec 05, 2014

This is an interview I gave to an Armenian magazine while I was in Yerevan. Some good stuff. For example:  "What is the open education? The open teaching philosophy is about sharing and what’ s really significant about it -- it’ s not sharing content like textbook or lecture. The idea is that you share the actual experience you have or practice you want to talk about."

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Categories: Miscellaneous

Why MOOCs are only part of the answer for higher education

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 19:00


Tony Bates, online learning and distance education resources, Dec 03, 2014

For the record, I have never thought of Tony Bates as a critic of MOOCs, particularly, though he has certainly weighed in with his opinions on how they could be improved (which is what we would hope for and expect). here is a case in point. He writes, "cMOOCs have the most potential, because lifelong learning will become increasingly important, and the power of bringing a mix of already well educated and knowledgeable people from around the world to work with other committed and enthusiastic learners on common problems or areas of interest could truly revolutionise not just education, but the world in general. However, cMOOCs at present are unable to do this, because they lack organisation and do not apply what is already known about how online groups work best." Of course, I regard these criticisms of MOOCs as features of MOOCs, and not flaws. I respect the research, but I believe it was conducted with an incomplete understanding of internet technologies and learning models based in personal development rather than content acquisition.

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Categories: Miscellaneous

Careful with that Axe, Eugene!

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 19:00
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Valdis Krebs, T N T : The Network Thinkers, Dec 03, 2014

A big headline in the local newspaper trumpeted the fact that the City is eliminating 19 positions (something their cost-averse editors deeply love). This seems unwise at the best of times, but the city is closing the positions "by attrition", which is the equivalent of using random selection. That's often a really bad idea.  It's hard to imagine something more demoralizing than the realization that, when you leave, nobody will replace you. As Harold Jarche points out, even targeted job reductions can miss the mark. How often have governments and corporations let key catalysts in their operation go because they looked only at the job description, and not at the person? But this same reasoning also applies to developing the organization. Social network analysis is crucial to understanding what a person actually does, so that when the time to replace the person (in more enlightened places, at least) management will have a good idea what talents and qualities are needed to do the job. Via Harold Jarche.

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Categories: Miscellaneous

Two design models for online collaborative learning: same or different?

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 12/03/2014 - 19:00
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Tony Bates, online learning and distance education resources, Dec 03, 2014

Tony Bates looks at "what we might call the Toronto school, Linda Harasim and her former colleagues at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) in Toronto (although Linda has been  firmly based for 25 years at SFU in Vancouver/Burnaby), and the Alberta school, Randy Garrison, and colleagues Terry Anderson and Walter Archer." Both sets of thinkers were influential in Canadian distance education in the 90s and beyond. Interestingly - but perhaps not surprisingly - both sets were interested in what Harasim called online collaborative learning (OCL) and the other three called the Community of Inquiry Model (CoI). As Bates says, "online collaborative learning can lead to deep, academic learning, or transformative learning, as well as, if not better than, discussion in campus-based classrooms." But it doesn't scale well, and requires the contribution of skilled instructors.

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