Miscellaneous

May’s “The Best” Lists — There Are Now 1,430 Of Them! | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 08:15
Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… …For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL May’s “The Best” Lists — There Are Now 1,430 Of Them!

May 29, 2015 by Larry Ferlazzo | 0 comments

Here’s my monthly round-up of new “The Best…” lists I posted this month (you can see all 1,430 of them categorized here).  There weren’t many this month, but I’ll be making up for it in June when I post all my “mid-year” annual lists:

The Best Videos About The Famous “Trolley Problem”

In ASCD Education Leadership: Read My Choices For The Best Eleven Mobile-Learning Apps

The Best “Sound Maps” & Webcams For Teaching Geography

The Best Resources For Learning About Restorative Practices – Help Me Find More

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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I'm Larry Ferlazzo and here you will catch me talking about websites that will help you teach ELL, ESL and EFL!

Read This Info! All My “The Best” Lists Subscribe! Blogroll Favorite Links Favorite Posts Follow this blog
Share My Blog with your network My Latest Book On Student Motivation

"Building A Community Of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies To Help Students Thrive In School and Beyond" was published in 2015 by Routledge

My Latest Book

"Classroom Management Q&As: Expert Strategies for Teaching" is an edited compilation from my Ed Week teacher advice column, along with new materials.

My Second Book On Student Motivation!

"Self-Driven Learning: Teaching Strategies for Student Motivation" is a sequel to "Helping Students Motivate Themselves"

My Second Book On Teaching ELLs

My book, "The ESL/ELL Teacher's Survival Guide: Ready-to-Use Strategies, Tools, and Activities for Teaching English Language Learners of All Levels," (co-authored by Katie Hull Sypnieski) was published in the Summer of 2012

You can find out more about it here, including accessing free excerpts and resources. My Book On Student Motivation

"Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Problems," was published in the Spring of 2011. You can read many free excerpts to it here Look for its sequel in early 2013! My Book On Teaching English Language Learners

My book, "English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies That Work," was published by Linworth Publishing in April, 2010.

You can read an excerpt here and learn how to order it. My Parent Engagement Book Subscribe By Email Enter your Email


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50 Things You Can Do With Google Classroom! | daveburgess.com

Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 08:15

50 Things You Can Do With Google Classroom! May 28, 2015 — Leave a comment

The use of Google Classroom is exploding in education right now and it is our honor to have had the chance to work with two of the foremost experts on the topic to bring you the ultimate guide, 50 Things You Can Do With Google Classroom.

Alice Keeler and Libbi Miller are education professors at Fresno State University who not only actively use Google Classroom, but also teach the use of this powerful tool to their education students. They know exactly how to take any user, regardless of their current level of knowledge, to a point where they are not only comfortable with the implementation of this amazing resource, but able to tap into the wide and varied ways it can powerfully transform both instruction and organization.

It is a beautiful, 8”x10”, silky matte finish book with multiple full-color screenshots showing you exactly what you need to know to start optimizing your use of Google Classroom right away. Many schools and districts are using this resource as an excellent support to the PD they are already providing and others are finding it the perfect way to bridge the gap in knowledge that may be holding some teachers back due to a lack of PD.

The book starts with a wonderful introduction from Director of Project Management at Google, Jonathan Rochelle, who was a co-creator of Classroom. It continues with everything a teacher needs to know, from an overview of Google Drive and Docs, a simplified “Getting Started” section, a quick tour of the “teacher view” and the “student view”, and then right into the 50 things you can do with it right NOW. As is the hallmark of Dave Burgess Consulting, Inc. books, this was written by PRACTITIONERS for PRACTITIONERS. Alice and Libbi not only do this stuff…they teach this stuff and know how to show you how to do it, too!

You can get 50 Things You Can Do With Google Classroom here on Amazon. If you buy the paperback, you can even add the Kindle version for only $2.99.

If you are interested in bulk pricing we would be happy to help you directly! You can contact us at shelley@daveburgessconsulting.com and we’ll get right back to you.

Thank you!

Dave Burgess

PS: Do you want to bring a bring live Google Classroom PD right to your school, district, or conference? Let us know!

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Just Sent-Out Free Email Newsletter | Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day…

Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 08:15
Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day… …For Teaching ELL, ESL, & EFL Just Sent-Out Free Email Newsletter

May 29, 2015 by Larry Ferlazzo | 0 comments

I’ve just mailed out the June issue of my simple free monthly email newsletter.

It has over 2,200 subscribers, and you can subscribe here.

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Author: Larry Ferlazzo

I'm a high school teacher in Sacramento, CA.

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Thanks for dropping past my Blog!



I'm Larry Ferlazzo and here you will catch me talking about websites that will help you teach ELL, ESL and EFL!

Read This Info! All My “The Best” Lists Subscribe! Blogroll Favorite Links Favorite Posts Follow this blog
Share My Blog with your network My Latest Book On Student Motivation

"Building A Community Of Self-Motivated Learners: Strategies To Help Students Thrive In School and Beyond" was published in 2015 by Routledge

My Latest Book

"Classroom Management Q&As: Expert Strategies for Teaching" is an edited compilation from my Ed Week teacher advice column, along with new materials.

My Second Book On Student Motivation!

"Self-Driven Learning: Teaching Strategies for Student Motivation" is a sequel to "Helping Students Motivate Themselves"

My Second Book On Teaching ELLs

My book, "The ESL/ELL Teacher's Survival Guide: Ready-to-Use Strategies, Tools, and Activities for Teaching English Language Learners of All Levels," (co-authored by Katie Hull Sypnieski) was published in the Summer of 2012

You can find out more about it here, including accessing free excerpts and resources. My Book On Student Motivation

"Helping Students Motivate Themselves: Practical Answers To Classroom Problems," was published in the Spring of 2011. You can read many free excerpts to it here Look for its sequel in early 2013! My Book On Teaching English Language Learners

My book, "English Language Learners: Teaching Strategies That Work," was published by Linworth Publishing in April, 2010.

You can read an excerpt here and learn how to order it. My Parent Engagement Book Subscribe By Email Enter your Email


Preview | Powered by FeedBlitz Archives Select Month May 2015  (131) April 2015  (177) March 2015  (167) February 2015  (161) January 2015  (192) December 2014  (183) November 2014  (166) October 2014  (171) September 2014  (152) August 2014  (174) July 2014  (175) June 2014  (139) May 2014  (140) April 2014  (165) March 2014  (167) February 2014  (167) January 2014  (198) December 2013  (198) November 2013  (185) October 2013  (173) September 2013  (172) August 2013  (182) July 2013  (195) June 2013  (207) May 2013  (211) April 2013  (164) March 2013  (200) February 2013  (165) January 2013  (179) December 2012  (196) November 2012  (161) October 2012  (168) September 2012  (178) August 2012  (179) July 2012  (203) June 2012  (176) May 2012  (162) April 2012  (180) March 2012  (163) February 2012  (160) January 2012  (153) December 2011  (141) November 2011  (141) October 2011  (140) September 2011  (132) August 2011  (143) July 2011  (143) June 2011  (143) May 2011  (158) April 2011  (174) March 2011  (206) February 2011  (209) January 2011  (235) December 2010  (233) November 2010  (218) October 2010  (238) September 2010  (201) August 2010  (224) July 2010  (188) June 2010  (163) May 2010  (229) April 2010  (232) March 2010  (228) February 2010  (167) January 2010  (170) December 2009  (160) November 2009  (127) October 2009  (147) September 2009  (175) August 2009  (169) July 2009  (174) June 2009  (173) May 2009  (194) April 2009  (209) March 2009  (179) February 2009  (181) January 2009  (193) December 2008  (203) November 2008  (199) October 2008  (179) September 2008  (136) August 2008  (138) July 2008  (106) June 2008  (117) May 2008  (104) April 2008  (110) March 2008  (89) February 2008  (82) January 2008  (134) December 2007  (123) November 2007  (114) October 2007  (110) September 2007  (84) August 2007  (70) July 2007  (53) June 2007  (61) May 2007  (63) April 2007  (68) March 2007  (37) February 2007  (3) 0  (1) Categories Select Category Select Category a look back  (52) best of the year  (1,430) best tweets  (203) bilingual  (36) blogs  (650) book reviews  (1) British Council  (8) classroom practice  (476) dictionaries  (25) ed tech digest  (10) Ed Week Teacher  (435) ESL Carnival  (45) ESL Web  (114) geography  (249) grammar  (42) health  (171) hot spot interviews  (18) humor  (1) infographic  (78) infographics  (38) instruction  (44) Intermediate English  (212) interviews  (39) learning games  (537) lessons  (3) links I should posted  (153) listening  (162) math  (92) monthly best lists  (74) monthly updated lists  (2) most popular posts  (72) music and art  (254) nytimes  (33) photo galleries  (49) podcast  (60) popular site lists  (98) Post Rank  (37) quote  (193) reading  (726) research studies  (317) school reform  (1,608) science  (747) search engines  (104) social studies  (3,830) statistic  (39) subscribing to this blog  (3) talking  (221) teacher resources  (3,432) technology  (511) TOK  (208) top ten list  (103) twitter  (69) Uncategorized  (490) video  (1,276) viral marketing  (47) vocabulary  (246) web 2.0  (1,693) what do you do when  (15) writing  (527) Website With 8,000 Links
Larry Ferlazzo, Teacher Visit My Other Blog: Engaging Parents In School
Larry Ferlazzo, Teacher My Education Week Teacher Blog

My posts for Classroom Q & A with Larry Ferlazzo at Education Week Teacher. My NY Times Posts

Check out my education posts for the New York Times

My Posts at Edutopia

Check out my posts for Edutopia

My “Teaching English” British Council Posts My Amazon Author’s Page My BAM! Radio Show Awards Recent Comments ClustrMap Visit Larry Ferlazzo's profile on Pinterest. Google Translate — Translate this Page into Another Language! 2014 Edublog Awards Finalist 2014 Edublog Awards Finalist 2014 Edublog Awards Finalist

Copyright © 2015 | Theme: Yoko by Elmastudio

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Categories: Miscellaneous

7 reasons why your school should teach robotics and game design | eSchool News | eSchool News

Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:16
 Register |  Lost Password? 7 reasons why your school should teach robotics and game design img.postavatar {height: 45px; width: auto;} By Lynn Paul
January 13th, 2015 One teacher describes the big impact robotics, coding, and STEM has had on her students

I love every aspect of programming—the frustration, the creativity, everything. I taught myself and now I’m lucky enough to teach students how to code, build robots, and design mobile apps. I’m there to guide them, but the students, like me, are really learning these skills through their own hard work.

I think everyone should learn how to program and of course I’m no exception. My transformation from librarian-turned-tech facilitator to coding teacher started with a back room full of old busted computers. My school didn’t know what to do with them so I decided to fix them up and make them useful. Then I started thinking, “What else can I do?” I read something about Arduino and soon I was tinkering with parts, building, and programming anything I could get my hands on. It became a hobby.

When I moved to Plaquemine High School, near Baton Rouge, our principal had just written a big grant for the Dow Corp. to create a STEM program featuring elective classes in robotics and game design for 9-12th graders. When we got it, he asked me to design the curriculum, attend trainings, and teach the courses. It was a dream come true. Now I get to help students develop the creativity, logic, critical thinking, and career skills they need for the future. Here are seven reasons why every school should consider doing the same.

(Next page: why you can afford it and 6 other reasons)

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Comment:
  1. kbarnes01

    February 6, 2015 at 1:24 pm

    I work with a state-wide game design challenge. In the middle school I see lots of girls participating. The middle school winners for the past two years have been an all girls team. Female participation falls off a bit in high school.

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Education Week

Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15
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  • Higher Education Act Reauthorization: What You Need to Know Lauren Camera Wed May 27 20:13:48 CEST 2015 Share

    You may have noticed that with movement currently stalled on the Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization front, Congress has turned its attention to another pressing education matter—overhauling the Higher Education Act.

    The HEA, which expired at the end of 2013, is a sweeping piece of federal legislation that includes the entire student loan system, the Pell grant tuition assistance program for low- and middle-income students, teacher-preparation provisions, and various programs that help disadvantaged students access higher education.

    Most recently, Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., the chairman and ranking member of the Senate education committee, announced that they're forming bipartisan working groups to draft a reauthorization of the higher education law, a strategy not too different from the one they used to craft the bipartisan ESEA measure that's currently awaiting Senate floor time. The working groups will specifically address accreditation, accountability, affordability and financial aid, and sexual assault and safety.

    "The Higher Education Act we see today—a nearly 1,000-page law with an equal amount of pages devoted to higher education regulations—is simply the piling up of well-intentioned laws and regulations, done without anyone first weeding the garden," said Alexander in a statement, adding that his priorities include "eliminating unnecessary red tape, saving students money, and removing obstacles to innovation."

    The two have already held two hearings on how to rewrite the law. One focused on the role of consumer information in college choice; another looked at the idea of risk-sharing, in which colleges bear some financial responsibility for a portion of the federal loans that their students do not repay. A third hearing, which will address affordability issues, is scheduled for June 3.

    Meanwhile, on the other side of the U.S. Capitol, Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, has been focusing on a higher education legislative overhaul as well.

    So far this year Kline has convened two hearings on how the law might be re-imagined: a broad hearing that looked at flaws of the entire law, and a more narrowly focused hearing on how to increase access and completion for low-income and first-generation students.

    Republicans on the House committee said they're hoping to fix the law by focusing on five main areas: empowering students to make informed decisions, simplifying and improving student aid, promoting innovation, increasing access and completion, and ensuring strong accountability while limiting the federal role.

    You might recall that around this time last year Kline unveiled an 11-page white paper outlining his HEA reauthorization priorities. They included some heavy lifts, like consolidating all existing student loans into one loan, and all existing grants into one grant. The road map also proposed streamlining repayment plans into two options: a standard repayment plan, and some sort of income-contingent repayment plan.

    Members of Congress are serious about overhauling the law, and their efforts are bolstered by the fact that it expired in 2013. But the same issues that stand to hold up the ESEA reauthorization could also delay the higher education reauthorization—a congested congressional calendar, forthcoming appropriations battles, and looming 2016 presidential politics

    For now, however, education committees in both chambers are full-steam ahead.

    The behemoth higher education law includes lots of moving pieces, and it's easy to get overwhelmed by the big picture. Here's what's most important for K-12 followers:

    Know Before You Go: There's lots of focus on how to disburse the most useful and most accurate information about institutions of higher education to students and parents in a way that's not overwhelming. That information includes things like tuition and other fees, available scholarships, loans, and loan repayment estimates. It also includes data like graduation and dropout rates, job attainment rates, and average starting salaries.

    Or as Mark Schneider, former commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics, puts it, students should be able to easily answer these questions:
      • Will I get in?
      • Will I get out?
      • How long will it take?
      • How much will it cost?
      • How much will I make?


    While commissioner of NCES from 2005 until 2009, Schneider oversaw the creation of the U.S. Department of Education's College Navigator tool, which became a top priority on the Obama administration's higher education agenda. Republicans have criticized it for providing so much information that it actually overwhelms students and families and is therefore ineffective.

    Increasing Access and Completion:

    TRIO programs, a slate of programs that receive federal funding to help low-income and first-generation students go to college, will likely get some reformatting in an overhauled higher education law as there's been a longstanding battle over its scoring rubric.

    And with Republicans looking to shed some of the federal government's financial burden, programs like the College Access Challenge Grant will likely get some face time as well. That program provides matching funds to partnerships of federal, state, and local governments and philanthropic organizations that are aimed at increasing the number of low-income students who are college ready.

    Pell Grants:

    One of the most difficult parts of overhauling the Higher Education Act will be putting the Pell grant on solid financial footing. In the past, Congress has had trouble fully funding the Pell grant, which is a quasi-entitlement program and gets both discretionary and mandatory federal funding. During the recession, the Obama administration increased the income threshold for eligible recipients, and more people than ever accessed the grant, causing the cost of the program to skyrocket.

    Republicans have supported policies to change Pell eligibility requirements by limiting the grant to low-income students only and allowing students to draw down the federal aid over a six-year period. While Democrats support the latter, they are generally determined to maintain the maximum grant and eligibility for as many students as possible.

    Teacher Preparation:

    There are more than 80 teacher prep programs across 10 agencies, and a major goal of Republicans will be to streamline as many as possible. In fact, last year, Kline proposed shifting the Teacher Quality Partnership program into the ESEA altogether. Democrats, meanwhile, are more likely to seek to expand teacher prep offerings, especially for on-the-job training in high-need schools, rural schools, or high-need subjects. Share Back

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    Education Week

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15
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  • Key Issues for K-12 in Reauthorization of Higher Education Act Caralee Adams Thu May 28 18:17:24 CEST 2015 Share By Lauren Camera Cross-posted from Politics K-12

    You may have noticed that with movement currently stalled on the Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization front, Congress has turned its attention to another pressing education matter—overhauling the Higher Education Act.

    The HEA, which expired at the end of 2013, is a sweeping piece of federal legislation that includes the entire student loan system, the Pell grant tuition assistance program for low- and middle-income students, teacher-preparation provisions, and various programs that help disadvantaged students access higher education.

    Most recently, Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., respectively, the chairman and ranking member of the Senate education committee, announced that they're forming bipartisan working groups to draft a reauthorization of the higher education law, a strategy not too different from the one they used to craft the bipartisan ESEA measure that's currently awaiting Senate floor time. The working groups will specifically address accreditation, accountability, affordability and financial aid, and sexual assault and safety.

    "The Higher Education Act we see today—a nearly 1,000-page law with an equal amount of pages devoted to higher education regulations*mdash;is simply the piling up of well-intentioned laws and regulations, done without anyone first weeding the garden," said Alexander in a statement, adding that his priorities include "eliminating unnecessary red tape, saving students money, and removing obstacles to innovation."

    The two have already held two hearings on how to rewrite the law. One focused on the role of consumer information in college choice; another looked at the idea of risk-sharing, in which colleges bear some financial responsibility for a portion of the federal loans that their students do not repay. A third hearing, which will address affordability issues, is scheduled for June 3.

    Meanwhile, on the other side of the U.S. Capitol, Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the chairman of the House education committee, has been focusing on a higher education legislative overhaul as well.

    So far this year, Kline has convened two hearings on how the law might be re-imagined: a broad hearing that looked at flaws of the entire law, and a more narrowly focused hearing on how to increase access and completion for low-income and first-generation students.

    Republicans on the House committee said they're hoping to fix the law by focusing on five main areas: empowering students to make informed decisions, simplifying and improving student aid, promoting innovation, increasing access and completion, and ensuring strong accountability while limiting the federal role.

    It's unclear whether additional hearings are in the works or when Kline plans to introduce any legislative fixes.

    You might recall that around this time last year Kline unveiled an 11-page white paper outlining his HEA reauthorization priorities. They included some heavy lifts, like consolidating all existing student loans into one loan, and all existing grants into one grant. The road map also proposed streamlining repayment plans into two options: a standard repayment plan, and some sort of income-contingent repayment plan.

    Members of Congress are serious about overhauling the law, and their efforts are bolstered by the fact that it expired in 2013. But the same issues that stand to hold up the ESEA reauthorization could also delay the higher education reauthorization—a congested congressional calendar, forthcoming appropriations battles, and looming 2016 presidential politics

    For now, however, education committees in both chambers are full-steam ahead.

    The behemoth higher education law includes lots of moving pieces, and it's easy to get overwhelmed by the big picture. Here's what's most important for K-12 followers:

    Know Before You Go: There's lots of focus on how to disburse the most useful and most accurate information about institutions of higher education to students and parents in a way that's not overwhelming. That information includes things like tuition and other fees, available scholarships, loans, and loan repayment estimates. It also includes data like graduation and dropout rates, job attainment rates, and average starting salaries.

    Or as Mark Schneider, former commissioner of the National Center for Education Statistics, puts it, students should be able to easily answer these questions:
      • Will I get in?
      • Will I get out?
      • How long will it take?
      • How much will it cost?
      • How much will I make?


    While commissioner of NCES from 2005 until 2009, Schneider oversaw the creation of the U.S. Department of Education's College Navigator tool, which became a top priority on the Obama administration's higher education agenda. Republicans have criticized it for providing so much information that it actually overwhelms students and families and is therefore ineffective.

    Increasing Access and Completion:

    TRIO programs, a slate of programs that receive federal funding to help low-income and first-generation students go to college, will likely get some reformatting in an overhauled higher education law as there's been a longstanding battle over its scoring rubric.

    And with Republicans looking to shed some of the federal government's financial burden, programs like the College Access Challenge Grant will likely get some face time as well. That program provides matching funds to partnerships of federal, state, and local governments and philanthropic organizations that are aimed at increasing the number of low-income students who are college ready.

    Pell Grants:

    One of the most difficult parts of overhauling the Higher Education Act will be putting the Pell grant on solid financial footing. In the past, Congress has had trouble fully funding the Pell grant, which is a quasi-entitlement program and gets both discretionary and mandatory federal funding. During the recession, the Obama administration increased the income threshold for eligible recipients, and more people than ever accessed the grant, causing the cost of the program to skyrocket.

    Republicans have supported policies to change Pell eligibility requirements by limiting the grant to low-income students only and allowing students to draw down the federal aid over a six-year period. While Democrats support the latter, they are generally determined to maintain the maximum grant and eligibility for as many students as possible.

    Teacher Preparation:

    There are more than 80 teacher prep programs across 10 agencies, and a major goal of Republicans will be to streamline as many as possible. In fact, last year, Kline proposed shifting the Teacher Quality Partnership program into the ESEA altogether. Democrats, meanwhile, are more likely to seek to expand teacher prep offerings, especially for on-the-job training in high-need schools, rural schools, or high-need subjects. Share Back

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    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15
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  • High School, College Completion Rates Continue to Rise Catherine Gewertz Thu May 28 15:38:32 CEST 2015 Share

    New federal data show that the rates of high school graduation and bachelor's degree completion are on the rise, and traditionally underserved students are driving some of the biggest gains.

    This is but one of the many intriguing tidbits for education-watchers in the most recent "Condition of Education" report, a massive data dump that landed with a silent thud today in cyberspace, courtesy of the National Center for Education Statistics. And it's interesting to take a look at, since President Barack Obama's administration has put such a heavy emphasis on high school and college completion.

    A quick glance at the graphs on high school and four-year-college completion shows the upward trend since 1990. Here's the high school graph. Since they focus on people in their mid to late 20s, these numbers look a lot better than they would if the government had tracked the number of students who had earned diplomas within a couple years of high school. But even still, they're worth a look for their overall direction, and the breakout of attainment by race and ethnicity.

    Here's the graph for college completion:

    What these graphs don't show, however, are the exact size of the gains each year and where they're coming from. For that, you have to go the dazzling Table 104.20.

    So let's take a look at how the numbers have moved from 2009, when Obama took office, to 2014, the most recent data included in the new "Condition of Education." We can compare that period to the previous five-year period, 2004-2009. These numbers can't establish causality, of course, because a lot of factors shape them. But they're still intriguing, given the big push for improving our high school and college outcomes.

    High school completion:

    2009 to 2014, all adults 25-29 years old: gained 2.2 percentage points (2004 to 2009: gained 2 percentage points)

    2009 to 2014, whites: 1 point gain. (2004 to 2009: 1.3 point gain)

    2009 to 2014, blacks: 3 point gain (2004 to 2009: .2 point gain)

    2009 to 2014, Hispanics: 5.8 point gain (2004 to 2009: 6.5 point gain)

    2009 to 2014, Asians: 1.2 point gain (2004-2009: 1 point gain)

    Bachelor's degree completion:

    2009 to 2014, all adults 25-29 years old: 3.4 percentage-point gain. (2004 to 2009: 1.9 percentage-point gain)

    2009 to 2014, whites: 3.6 point gain (2004 to 2009: 2.7-point gain)

    2009 to 2014, blacks: 3.5 point gain. (2004 to 2009: 1.8 point gain)

    2009 to 2014, Hispanics: 2.9 point gain (2004 to 2009: 1.3 point gain)

    2009 to 2014, Asians: 4.4 point gain (2004 to 2009: 4.5 point decline)

    At the diploma level, black and Hispanic students made the biggest gains in the last five years, but each group offers a distinct profile of improvement over time. While black students made little progress in high school graduation rates in the five years before the Obama administration took office, they made big gains in the five years since, according to the NCES data. Hispanic students, on the other hand, saw a big improvement in the five years leading up to Obama's election, and a more moderate one since then.

    At the bachelor's degree level, black students didn't show as big a leap in attainment from one five-year period to another. The modest gain of 2004 to 2009 improved in the most recent five years, but not as sharply as it did at the high school level. A similar pattern shows with Hispanic students. But black students' rate of improvement in earning bachelor's degrees kept pace with that of white students in the past five years. Asian students rebounded from a decline in bachelor's degree attainment the previous five years.

    Get Curriculum Matters delivered to your inbox as soon as new posts are published. Sign up here. Also, for news and analysis of issues at the core of classroom learning.

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    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15
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  • Miami-Dade Postpones Proposed Changes to Foreign Language Instruction Corey Mitchell Thu May 28 20:09:20 CEST 2015 Share

    Miami-Dade schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho told the Miami Herald that he will postpone scheduled changes to the way the district teaches foreign languages.

    Amid growing criticism of his plan, the superintendent will convene a task force to work on proposals that could roll out during the 2016-17 school year.

    Under Carvalho's proposed plan, students would not receive bilingual instruction unless they're in intensive language immersion programs with instruction in subjects such as math, science, and social studies split between English and another language.

    Once fully implemented, the school system's "extended foreign language" program would bolster foreign language instruction by making it more intensive, but not available to all students.

    The district has already begun to phase out daily 30-minute Spanish classes for kindergarten, 1st grade and 2nd grade students, a move that has drawn criticism from the NAACP, League of United Latin American Citizens, and other groups. The instruction for 3rd grade students would have been cut this fall.

    Educators who would have been charged with executing the "extended foreign language" program also had objections.

    A story by Miami Herald reporter Christian Veiga highlights the concerns of Spanish-language teachers. Many said that they would be forced to teach classes in Spanish in math or other subjects in which they are not certified. Veiga's piece also reveals that Miami-Dade schools, based in a region with a sizable Spanish-speaking population, struggles to find qualified Spanish teachers.

    Carvalho told the newspaper's editorial board that parents' demand for rigorous bilingual education for their children prompted the district to explore ways to overhaul how it teaches students a second language.

    "This has never been about getting rid of bilingualism; it's about improving the way we teach Spanish," Mr. Carvalho said.

    Now district officials are headed back to the drawing board.

    Rosa Castro Feinberg, an English-language learner activist and former Miami-Dade school board member, said in an interview with Education Week that she applauds Carvalho "for his decision to upgrade Spanish programs with input from stakeholders and expert members of a task force."

    "He has shown wisdom ... in thereby respecting his board members' oft stated support for instruction leading to biliteracy. A fully transparent process for the task force will do much to allay the concerns of Miami-Dade communities," she said. Share Back

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    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15
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  • In One Tribal District, Native Teachers May Be Key to Improvement Jackie Mader Thu May 28 19:03:51 CEST 2015 Share

    A tribal school district in Wisconsin has increased the percentage of Native American teachers in its schools and has found that the strategy may be linked to improving academic performance, according to a story by WUWM Public Radio.

    The Menominee Indian school district in the eastern part of the state has worked with the College of Menominee Nation to "grow its own" teachers, which has resulted in an increase of Native teachers from about 20 percent to 35 percent over the past decade. Since 2008, the graduation rate in the district has jumped from 60 percent to more than 95 percent. Part of the reason, according to the story, may be that students have more examples of tribal members who have succeeded due to an education.

    Superintendent Wendell Waukau told WUWM that it's important to have teachers who understand where students come from, which also means it is important to educate non-Native teachers. "In the very beginning, we will say to the teachers: Our kids are not broke. They don't need to be saved. Build relationships, learn about the culture, learn how out community operates," Waukau said.

    A 2011 report in the Journal of Indigenous Research found that with few postsecondary programs graduating consistent numbers of American Indian teachers, "many reservation schools continue to hire temporary and sometimes poorly-prepared teachers to fill in the gaps." Native teachers have been historically underrepresented in teacher education schools, and account for less than one percent of the teachers enrolled in teacher preparation programs, even though about 1.3 percent of students in K-12 identify as Native students. During the 2011-12 school year, less than one percent of teachers nationwide identified as American Indian or Alaska Native, a percentage has remained consistent over the past decade.

    Nationwide, many universities have ramped up efforts to recruit and train more Native teachers, some with the help of federal grants. Last year, Oregon's Portland State University received $1.2 million in federal money to recruit American Indian students to its teacher-preparation program. The University of Wisconsin-Superior and Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College established a Native American teacher program in 2012, and Teach For America has also launched an initiative to recruit more Native teachers, especially in states like South Dakota with high populations of Native students. Share Back

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    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15
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  • The Perfect Teaching Candidate Starr Sackstein Sat May 23 17:07:31 CEST 2015 Share

    Intelligent. Compassionate. Patient.

    Or organized. Knowledgeable. Collaborative?

    What qualities personify the perfect teaching candidate?

    Like with most questions, it depends on whom you ask and the specific needs of any learning community.

    Regardless of how folks look on paper, there is no replacement for experience in the field and a solid sense of self. Teaching needs to be the most collaborative profession, instead it is unusually the most isolating and therefore the right candidate must possess certain less than obvious qualities.

    When considering a teaching position, the candidate needs to interview the school as much as the administration needs to review the person because career longevity is all about the fit.

    We all know that it is easy to say the right or wrong thing in an interview, but there are ways to avoid general pitfalls. After a #satchathack, I realized that there are many things that can be deal breakers for administration when selecting a candidate.

    Here are deal breakers that were mentioned:
    • People who don't come with questions about the school in the interview
    • Folks who refuse to admit short-comings
    • Candidates who's philosophy doesn't align with the school's in areas like: mastery, revision, homework, late work, grading etc
    • Unconnected people who aren't on Twitter or other social media


    Ideal teachers possess all of the following (in no particular order):
    • Life long learners, always looking to improve
    • Eager to connect with diverse leaders to continue to improve practice
    • Are voracious readers, modeling what they expect of their students
    • Transparent in their expectations
    • Exhibits a good attitude and a growth mindset
    • Models mistakes and growing from them
    • Comfortable not-knowing, but eager to problem solve
    • Technology is seamlessly integrated into their practice
    • Student learning is of the utmost importance - they don't control, they conduct, facilitate- empower
    • Creative and open to trying new things
    • A natural relationship builder and a good reader of situations
    • Hard working and nurturing
    • Responsible


    Good candidates should always be learning, like the students we teach. They are looking for ways to connect with thought leaders and are eager to grow as learners themselves. Making mistakes publicly and sharing that transparent moment to help kids develop better.

    So much of what we do as teachers is intangible. Developing relationships in order to better read student needs and adjusting accordingly to ensure the best learning experiences is essential. It's not good enough to be knowledgeable about content area or the latest technology, a good candidate wants to help improve the school community in meaningful and impactful ways.

    What characteristics would you look for in a new teacher if you were on a hiring committee? Please share Share Back

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    Educator Insights Webinar - Essential Tools for My Flipped Math Classroom

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 04:15

    ExploreLearning  |  110 Avon Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902  |  866.882.4141  |  outreach@explorelearning.com

    Play Webinar Recording

    Educator Insights Webinar:
    Essential Tools for My Flipped Math Classroom

    Dan Muscarella, M.Ed., NBCT, is a high school mathematics teacher in Ashburn, VA. He has taught everything from Math 7 through AP Calculus, and is currently teaching Geometry and Pre-Calculus.

    Dan Muscarella, a high school math teacher in Ashburn, VA, shares the lessons (and tools) he has learned from flipping his math classroom.

    Dan provides insight on why he decided to flip his classroom, how he set it up, the tools he uses, as well as providing YOU with all of the resources you should need to start flipping your classroom.

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    How IT and the Role of the CIO is Changing in the Era of Networked Organizations

    Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 02:00
    Display


    Dion Hinchcliffe, On Digital Strategy, May 28, 2015

    I know that this is the way we want to go. But I also know it's really difficult. If I need a product built, say, how do I get that large cluster of self-managing units to do it? If I need email to function on the weekends, what motivation does the SaaS provider to do that? If I need to connect my laptop to the network, why would IT security enable that? A network structure does away with command and control, but to work it has to replace that with mechanisms that motivate mutually supportive practices. And these are hard to design.

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    Minreeva Blog - Minreeva Learning

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 00:15
    www.minreeva.com What is Gamification?

    3/2/2015

    Comments

      'Gamification' - here's another fairly recent term that's making quite a noise in all aspects of business, globally - and it's not just the e/m-learning world. For the e/m-learning community - the current buzz word is "gamification of learning."

    As the term suggests, "gamification" is the use of a gaming approach in non-gaming contexts. In an e-learning context, gamification mainly involves creating games for your learners to help them achieve targeted learning outcomes. 

    The best thing about gamification is that it uses motivation to enhance the learning experience of learners; thus enhancing retention. Moreover, it uses personal achievements/records, friendly competition, and FUN, to make the learning experience more valuable and more effective.

    On the other hand, the main challenge with gamification is that, not all aspects of business (or learning) can be gamified. Having mentioned this, there is also a tendency for creators to go overboard with the gaming side and leave a very under-developed "skill-building/learning outcome side."

    Our suggestion: use a gamification approach sparingly. Don't gamify a part of a business (or curriculum) just for the heck of it.

    Here's a short video from John Broadbent explaining what gamification is. Our hats off  to our friends at Netmark University for this piece! Cheers!

    What do you think about gamification and it's benefits and detriments to e/m-learning? Let us know through the comments field below: 


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    Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Creating Flipped Lessons With VideoNotes | Practical Ed Tech

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Fri, 05/29/2015 - 00:00
    Practical Ed Tech Teaching Teachers to Teach With Technology Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Creating Flipped Lessons With VideoNotes

    Over the last few years I’ve tried a bunch of tools for building flipped video lessons. As I do with most categories of ed tech tools, I gravitate to those that are easy to use and integrate with other tools. VideoNot.es is one of my favorite tools for flipped classroom settings because it is easy to use and it integrates with Google Drive. VideoNotes allows you to load a video on the left side of your screen then on the right side of the screen VideoNotes gives you a notepad on which to type. In the video embedded below I provide an overview of how to use VideoNot.es.

    Here are this week’s most popular posts on FreeTech4Teachers.com:
    1. How to Create a Jeopardy-style Game in Google Spreadsheets
    2. How to Use Doctopus and Goobric to Grade Google Classroom Assignments
    3. Using Timelines as Digital Portfolios and Reflections on Learning
    4. How to Add Custom Columns to Padlet Walls
    5. ReadWorks Now Offers Poems and Question Sets for K-12 Classrooms
    6. PicCollage, ThingLink, and A Visit to the USS Alabama
    7. A Couple of Graphing Calculators for Your Chrome Browser

    As you think about professional development in 2015, consider a custom PD webinar for your school. I also offer in-person workshops and keynote presentations

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    University guide 2016: Open University | Education | The Guardian

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 23:45
    Close sign in subscribe search jobs more from the guardian: change edition: US edition browse all sections close University profiles University guide 2016: Open University Our at-a-glance guide to the Open University The Open University currently has more than 250,000 students Public domain Public Domain

    The UK's largest university and a world leader in distance education, the Open University has helped more than half a million students gain a qualification, many having little prior educational achievement.

    The OU currently has around 200,000 students, including more than 10,000 overseas. The OU has been one of the top three UK universities each year for student satisfaction since the national student survey began.

    Students are taught via cutting-edge technology, with support from regionally based tutors and peer support from the OU's online community of students and alumni.

    The flexible nature of studying with the OU means that more than 70% of its students are earning while they learn.

    Fees
    Fees vary. The cost of full-time OU study (120 credits) works out at £5400 per year. So, 60 credits cost £2,700. Most OU students study 60 credits a year over six years for an honours degree.

    Financial support
    If you're on benefits or your income is less than £25,000, you may be eligible for a free introductory access module to build your confidence and skills before moving on to a full OU course. Once you've registered, you may be able to get help with study-related costs like travel, childcare and internet access.

    The disabled students' allowance (DSA) is a government grant to cover study support costs if you have a disability. It's not means tested, and there's no age limit.

    Contact
    Tel:
    0845 300 60 90
    Email: general-enquiries@open.ac.uk
    Web: open.ac.uk

    More profiles Topics popular The Guardian back to top all sections close © 2015 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved.
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    Report: Competency Ed Needs To Show 'Credible Evidence' To Prove Validity -- Campus Technology

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 23:45
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    Report: Competency Ed Needs To Show 'Credible Evidence' To Prove Validity

    While many competency-based education (CBE) programs do a decent job of documenting the competencies students need to master and the types of assessments used to measure student proficiency, that doesn't go far enough, according to a new report on the topic of assessment in CBE.

    Moving forward, a new report from Pearson recommended, CBE program designers "should work to clarify the links between the tasks students complete on an assessment and the competencies those tasks are designed to measure." On top of that, CBE programs need to be validated against external standards in order to prove to employers that a competency-based education is "credible evidence of students' career readiness."

    The new report, titled, "Measuring Mastery," provides best practices for schools in how to validate assessments and establish performance levels that tie to "real-world mastery." The report was written by Pearson researchers Katie McClarty, director of the Center for College & Career Success, and Matthew Gaertner, a senior research scientist. It's being distributed by the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), a private, nonpartisan, not-for-profit organization that researches and attempts to influence policy on government, politics, economics and social welfare. Education is one of AEI's research focuses.

    "CBE programs have generally done a good job defining the relevant competencies, that is, what students need to know, and what they'll learn," said McClarty in a prepared statement. "The next critical step will be gathering empirical evidence that documents the relationship between competency mastery and future success."

    The report offers four recommendations:

    • CBE programs need to "clearly define" competencies with enough detail and document the evidence that assessments "fully measure" them. The result would be improved transparency "around the processes and expectations" of the program;
    • Conduct research to validate CBE assessments against other assessments. The researchers suggest that CBE programs could collaborate to gather the necessary evidence to show "an empirical relationship";
    • Use the results of empirical research to develop the initial process for setting standards. For example, the report stated, CBE assessments could be given to employees currently working in the relevant fields, and the results of student assessments could be compared to those results; and
    • CBE programs should track the outcomes of graduates' later lives in order to gather evidence that a CBE credential stands for a level of preparation equivalent to a traditional college degree. The outcomes could be measured, the report suggested, "in terms of subsequent academic performance or through job attainment, job performance, occupational prestige or earnings."

    The report is publicly available on AEI's site.

    AIE will host a live and online panel to discuss CBE on May 21 at 3:30 p.m. Eastern time. Presenters will include Pearson's McClarty as well as representatives from Excelsior College, Seton Hall University and the Association of American Colleges & Universities.

    About the Author

    Dian Schaffhauser is a writer who covers technology and business for a number of publications. Contact her at dian@dischaffhauser.com.

    Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus Webcasts A Simple DIY Approach to Tracking and Improving Student Learning Outcomes Why Blogging Is Key to the Future of Higher Ed UC Berkeley Develops 'Deep Learning' for Robot Cutting-Edge Student-Centric Classrooms Handle Many Pedagogies at Drexel 5 Ways to Create a 'Post-PC Environment' A Simple DIY Approach to Tracking and Improving Student Learning Outcomes Right-Fitting Students with Majors Increases Chances of College Success Why Blogging Is Key to the Future of Higher Ed Report: Competency Ed Needs To Show 'Credible Evidence' To Prove Validity Ball State Students as Developers: Not Just Technology Users
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    SIFF film dives deep into project-based learning | The Seattle Times

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 23:45
    Menu Menu Shortcuts Education Lab Education Lab Education Lab SIFF film dives deep into project-based learning Originally published May 28, 2015 at 5:05 am Updated May 28, 2015 at 12:10 pm

    "Most Likely to Succeed" is screening in Bellevue on Thursday and at SIFF next week.

    By Staff reporter

    In “Most Likely to Succeed,” Bellevue-bred filmmaker Greg Whiteley asks you to question just about everything you know about education.

    What if there were no school bells? No set class periods, no single-subject courses and no mandate to prepare kids for standardized tests?

    It might look like High Tech High — the San Diego charter school featured in the film, which will screen at the Seattle International Film Festival on June 1 and 2. And that approach might better prepare kids for what they will actually be asked to do in their rapidly changing futures, Whiteley says.

    While making the film, Whiteley followed two groups of ninth graders as they researched, constructed and presented a year-long project that involved learning things traditionally taught in separate classrooms, by different teachers. The result is a documentary that charts a history of the American education system and offers a deep look into one new approach to learning.

    But the film, Whiteley said, is about more than that one approach — also known as project-based learning. Whiteley and executive producer Ted Dintersmith, a former venture capitalist, said the film will show that classrooms as we know them are outdated, and make the case for why they believe education needs to change.

    “We are having kids spend almost all their school days on things they don’t care about, things they’ll never use and things that they memorize just to forget two weeks later,” Dintersmith said. The age of education being about acquiring knowledge is gone, they say. Knowledge is everywhere, and nearly free. It’s attached to any Internet-connected device.

    Instead, they say, kids need some softer skills: independent thinking, working with others, decision-making.

    One common retort might be that teaching kids in these intense, sometimes year-long projects based on one topic will not prepare them for wide-ranging standardized tests. Dintersmith agrees.

    But for him, asking what should be taught so kids do best on mandated exams or college-placement tests is not the most important question.

    The more pressing issue, he said, is: “What’s right for life?”

    The idea of a new way of teaching seems to be gaining some traction in Washington.

    Anoo Padte, who runs a local education consulting group called The Art of Education, said the hands-on learning shown in the film could go a long way toward reaching disinterested kids who otherwise would drop out of school.

    “They’re exploring complex questions,” Padte said of the type of learning the film portrays. “They’re creating things. They’re expressing themselves, rather than passively absorbing materials.”

    Her group is hosting a screening of the film Thursday in Bellevue, followed by a Q&A with a small panel that will include a student from Highline’s Big Picture school, which uses the project-based approach.

    Tickets are still available, Padte said.

    Another education-related documentary showing at SIFF, “Paper Tigers,” follows troubled kids at an alternative Walla Walla high school.

    Looking for other, education-related films? Try “The Dark Horse,” “Excuse My French, ” or “The Teacher’s Diary.”

    Most Likely to Succeed Trailer from One Potato Productions on Vimeo.

    Leah Todd: 206-464-8246 or ltodd@seattletimes.com; on Twitter: @leahktodd.

    View Comments No personal attacks or insults, no hate speech, no profanity. Please keep the conversation civil and help us moderate this thread by reporting any abuse. See our Commenting FAQ. Powered by Livefyre

    The opinions expressed in reader comments are those of the author only, and do not reflect the opinions of The Seattle Times.

    Elsewhere in Mark Higgins column How to work with nature instead of against it to tame flooding rivers Jon Talton Paul Allen, Charter and what might have been Larry Stone It’s time to let Smith replace Rodney as closer Concert review Barry Manilow works magic in Seattle concert Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company | Privacy statement | Terms of service
    Categories: Miscellaneous

    4 major issues of the Higher Education Act reauthorization - eCampus News | eCampus News

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 23:45
     Register |  Lost Password? Visit our other sites - eSchool News - eClassroom News Menu  #submenu a{z-index:11;} 4 major issues of the Higher Education Act reauthorization img.postavatar {height: 45px; width: auto;} May 21st, 2015 Working groups will examine current issues facing higher ed as they work toward the 9th reauthorization of HEA.

    Senate education committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-Wash.) today announced several bipartisan, full committee staff working groups to address four major issues related to the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.

    “The Higher Education Act we see today—a nearly 1,000 page law with an equal amount of pages devoted to higher education regulations—is simply the piling up of well-intentioned laws and regulations, done without anyone first weeding the garden,” said Alexander.

    “I look forward to working with Senator Murray as we start from scratch in reauthorizing the Higher Education Act to find ways to best serve students and taxpayers by eliminating unnecessary red tape, saving students money, and removing obstacles to innovation in the best system of higher education in the world.”

    (Next page: The four key Higher Education Act issues)

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    Rhizo15 – No Content At All

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 20:08
    ‘No Content At All’ – sung to the tune of an ancient folk song, ‘No Hips At All’ (don’t ask!). I couldn’t get its tune out of my head while weeding my garden so here it is – rhizomatically hacked.   No Content At All Come all ye young teachers and listen to me while […]
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    Should You Upgrade to 802.11ac?

    Education (Spigot Aggregator) - Thu, 05/28/2015 - 17:10
    The latest WiFi specification promises speed and capacity advantages, but the performance it delivers will depend on your district's devices and infrastructure.
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