Miscellaneous

Pearson, WTF? Badges, patents, and the world’s ‘least popular’ education company

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 20:35

Doug Belshaw, Open Educational Thinkering, Nov 23, 2017

Doug Belshaw has two bits of news about Pearson in this article. First, he reports on Pearson's new application to patent digital credentials (you know, like badges). It's only something Belshaw and others have been working on for years now. "he ‘background’ section uses language very similar to the Open Badges for Lifelong Learning working paper published in 2012 by Mozilla."  Additionally, he notes that " they have closed their DRM-Free ebook store, and will now proceed to delete all ebooks from their customers’ accounts." Well, I'm glad I didn't buy any eBooks from Pearson! "Perhaps I should have been more cynical, as they obviously are," writes Belshaw. "I note, for example, that Pearson waited until Mozilla handed over stewardship of Open Badges to IMS Global Learning Consortium (who have said they will not contest the patent) before filing." Will not contest? Seriously, IMS?

[Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Innovation Culture

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 19:33

Rideau Hall Foundation, Nov 23, 2017

This website, and the associated project around it, are an outcome of the previous Governor-General of Canada, David Johnston, working with Tom Jenkins (of the Jenkins report on science and technology in Canada). The site says "Innovation is the creative combination of anything that, once done, makes something better." I have mixed views. The Canadian Museum of Science and Technology, now part of co-sponsor Ingenium, was one of my favourite childhood destinations. It just reopened (yay!). I should visit. And you can submit Canadian Innovation Stories (note that the site is slow). But innovation seems to me to be more than just 'combining' things, and more than just 'making something better'. The Governor-General's Innovation Awards, associated with the site, are almost exclusively for medical innovations and/or businesses. There are education resources, including a children's resource, that defines innovation as "creating or improving a thing (product) or action (process) to make a difference (impact)." This seems even narrower to me. It's not all about business. Disclosure: I was peripherally involved with the education resources and my name appears in the acknowledgements.

[Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Open In Order To...

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 18:43

OpenCon2017, Nov 23, 2017

These are all papers submitted to OpenCon2017 in response to an essay competition that closed today. The conference is tomorrow. You might be able to vote but I encourage reading rather than voting. The papers run in the 500-1000 work range.

The conference is subtitled 'Empowering the next generation to advance open access, open education and open data'. I like how the essays represent a variety of different agendas and benefits all revolving around the idea of open access.

 

[Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Learning Experience Platform – WRONG

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 16:03

Craig Weiss, The Craig Weiss Group, Nov 23, 2017

The 'wrong' in this article refers to the term 'experience'. Craig Weiss argues that the term houl be 'engagement' instead. Beyond that first argument he offers a pretty good overview of the platform, what is is, what it contains, and what it's supposed to do. He names a number of them at the end of the article: Learn AmpDegreedGrovoPathgather and Linkedin Learning. Based on both the description and the examples, my inclination would be to call them Learning Resource Platforms, because they are for the most part providing or selling access to learning content and resources.

[Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous

Creating a Safety Net — Why Double-Dipping Is the Wrong Term and the Right Approach

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 11:30

Kent Anderson, The Scholarly Kitchen, Nov 23, 2017

Kent Anderson launches a spirited defense of "double dipping" - this is the practice of charging publication fees on articles published in journals where there are also subscription fees. His argument, based on the collapse of advertising revenue for digital publications, is that companies need to support diverse income streams. No doubt this is true, however, charging different people for the same thing is something else. It's like when you pay the full cost of your internet bandwidth, and then your ISP charges someone else extra for permission to send data to you. It's the sort of price-gouging that would not be possible without people being locked into your service. Related: There's a Digital Media Crash, Talking Points Memo.

[Link] [Comment]

Categories: Miscellaneous
Syndicate content