Miscellaneous

MOOCs -- Completion Is Not Important

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 13:00
Display


Matthew LeBar, Forbes, [Sept] 25, 2014

It's old news in a recent article, but I've had a few people mention this article to me over the last few days: "data suggest that most of the students taking these courses are not doing it for a degree:  a survey of 35,000 MOOC students found that 79 to 86 percent of students already have a college degree   (the percentages vary from country to country). Many of the students took MOOCs to help them in their current job or in getting a new one, while only 13% took it to work towards a degree."

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

Canadian physicians get advice on how to handle ‘rate my doctor’ websites

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Thu, 09/25/2014 - 13:00
Display


Sharon Kirkey, Canada.com, [Sept] 25, 2014

A persistent myth in the U.S. about the Canadian health care system is that, because it's socialized healh care, we get no choice of doctors or facilities. This is in fact false; even in small centres like Moncton we can (and have) changed doctors or specialists. That's why a service like 'Rate My Doctor' can even exist in Canada, much less be useful. It is similar in form and function to 'Rate My Professor' (yes, we halso have choice of professors in out mostly socialized higher education system). This post provides advice to doctors on how to maintain their internet reputation. Hint: care about patients, tell them the truth, provide quality care, and keep your word. And listen to the feedback: "Rather than turn a blind eye to these ratings, doctors should consider monitoring what is being said about them, and take measured steps to deal with these reviews."

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

I’m Not in Love with the Word Empowerment

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 22:00


Bud Hunt, Bud the Teacher, [Sept] 24, 2014

I am generally in agreement with Bud Hunt's concern with the word 'empowerment' though I'm probably not going to stop using it. He says, "for me to empower you, especially when I hear the word used by others, I’ ve got to have something that you don’ t have, and I have to give it to you." In this sense, it is like 'giving freedom' or 'giving choice', as though these things wouldn't exist without your magnificence. But that isn't the sense in which I use the term - I think of 'empowerment' as supporting capacity. It's an act of helping rather than giving. But that requires first accepting that you had no legitimate power to give in the first place.

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

The MOOC Misstep and the Open Education Infrastructure

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 22:00
Display


David Wiley, iterating toward openness, [Sept] 24, 2014

Useful and interesting article by David Wiley saying some of the things that needed to be said without pulling any punches: "The horrific corruption perpetrated by the Udacity, Coursera, and other copycat MOOCs is to pretend that the last forty years never happened. Their modus operandi has been to copy and paste the 1969 idea of open entry into online courses in 2014."

He then proposes that we be clear about defining a sense of 'open' that is "worth the name". This type of 'open' includes "free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities:" retain, reuse, revise, remix, redistribute. As he writes, "These 5R permissions, together with a clear statement that they are provided for free and in perpetuity, are articulated in many of the Creative Commons licenses."

That's true. And I would include the CC by-NC-SA licenses I use. I think it's consistent with the 5Rs. But - and I think this is really important - the doctrine of fair use should also support these. All these 5Rs were things that I could do with print texts and vinyl LPs and radio broadcasts and the like when I was a kid. It's not that long ago. We shouldn't have to have a special license that allows us to to these things. Unless we're creating some sort of business out of it, we should already have these rights, out of the box.

It wasn't the file-sharers that produced piracy. It was the publishers. It was the expansion of laws governing commerce to include personal and private use. It was the redefinition of formerly legal acts into some new sort of crime.  These are the things that produced piracy. The creation of Creative Commons tacitly acknowledged that expansion of copyright limitations as a fait accompli. I don't accept it.

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous

Three Sample Branching Stories

Stephen Downes' OLDaily - Wed, 09/24/2014 - 22:00
Display


Clark Aldrich, Unschooling Rules, [Sept] 24, 2014

It's a bit like the state of gaming pre-PacMan, but I though it would be interesting to pass alone this link and set of examples from Clark Aldrich on creating branching stories. Maybe Jim Groom can take this and have his students deconstruct it into something interesting.

[Link] [Comment]
Categories: Miscellaneous
Syndicate content