iBerry Open Education Environment - - - - - work in progress

We would like to extend our mindmapping experiments by attempting to represent not only the open courseware links that we already have in our database but also links to other educational resources such as learning support. The idea is that

Hopping out of the Walled Garden

When I started 'Not a Blog' on iBerry about two years ago I was very diffident about blogging and I warbled, "I'm dubious about devoting time and energy to blogging as such. In setting up the News Aggregator I've looked at quite a few educational blogs. Some are fascinating and endless hours can be spent reading them but I've no particular wish, or more accurately the knowledge, to join the crowd and sound off on

Towards an Open Global Education Network (OGEN)

Although a truly Open Global Education Network (OGEN) is not yet a reality, it is useful in clarifying aims and objectives to consider what exists of its beginnings in the present and what the future could or should bring. At present, the 'Open Global Education' part of OGEN is mainly represented by Open Courseware (OCW) and, no doubt, this is a good foundation. Certainly, the popularity of today's OCW, in spite of its shortcomings, points to a huge global demand for inexpensive Higher Education by many people with different needs, expectations and backgrounds.

A Cautionary Tale

Professor Knowmore, podium under his arm, strode purposefully into the reception area of the new Networked Education Complex (NEC). Well it wasn't really all that new. The foundations had been laid some time ago but it was still under construction with a multitude of new rooms to explore and humming with diverse and ever-changing educational activities. The Professor fired a few well-chosen technical terms at the receptionist, Miss Oogle. She thought for a moment and began to

Everyone Has the Right to Education.

I have always been interested in following OCW initiatives of one type or another (many can be found here). They range from small sites, like iBerry, to huge university repositories such as MIT OpenCourseWare or the UK's Open University. For the most part, these large sites make available courseware that was created for funded students by paid academics. Non-paying remote learners are inevitably left on their own as far as important parts of the educational process are concerned, such as expert tuition, assessment or interaction with fellow students. Sometimes an attempt is made to involve OCW users, by providing a discussion forum but in my experience these forums are frequently empty or peppered with plaintive but unanswered pleas for basic assistance.

To be OCW or not

As time passes and yet more universities and colleges jump onto the OCW bandwagon I see a far greater variation in the OCW on offer. MIT has always offered material that ranges from very sketchy 'highlights' to superlative videoed presentations with comprehensive notes and fully-documented assignments but now some HE institutions are really plumbing the depths with thinly disguised advertising comprising little more than course descriptions and topic lists. (In some cases I've even found no tangible OCW at all!) Because OCW is offered without charge I think there has been a tendency among users to be less than critical but OCW has been a great success story in terms of promoting these institutions, otherwise would they continue to encourage the co-operation of their hard-pressed academic staff? I think the time has come to

End of the Year Greetings to all our Readers !! - (and some thoughts for the future)

Please enjoy whatever celebrations the end of the year may bring !

We also wish everyone a happy and prosperous New Year.

This is also a good time for one and all to think about the future of iBerry and we would very much like to hear from you, particularly if you are a frequent user of this site. Our main concern at present is

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